Avoiding basement insulation mistakes be the pro how to save money really fast

This is a great article – thanks for sharing. I was curious how you would apply your knowledge to how to save money really fast a damp basement situation? Due to moisture penetration issues through our basement cement block how to save money really fast wall foundation, an interior french drain was installed, which has worked perfectly. We installed a 9mm thick plastic vapor barrier up against how to save money really fast the wall so any water that comes in the foundation how to save money really fast above the weep holes will not touch the studs or how to save money really fast insulation, and will be diverted into the french drain. This has also worked quite well, however in the winter months we are getting condensation on how to save money really fast the outside of the vapor barrier, which in turn is making the fiberglass insulation wet. From what we have read, closed-cell spray foam seems to be the answer for insulating how to save money really fast in an environment that may experience dampness; however we are curious if we should spray the foam how to save money really fast on top of the vapor barrier, or take down the vapor barrier and spray the foam how to save money really fast up against the wall? Our concern is that the insulation will be getting damp how to save money really fast whether it is applied to the wall or the vapor how to save money really fast barrier, and want to ensure the moisture continues to be diverted how to save money really fast into the french drain. What setup of insulation might you recommend in this situation?

I just bought a new construction home and want to how to save money really fast finish the basement soon. I live in a a desert state (utah), but am always concerned about mold (though the lack of humidity in the air usually, but not always, reduces the chance of mold.). The builder put batt fiberglass insulation and used thick plastic how to save money really fast to keep it held against all the below grade walls how to save money really fast (diaper style). Obviously, removing all of that will take quite the dumpster and how to save money really fast a large amount of money to replace with XPS. First question: is it worth the switch to XPS? Second question: do I put a pressure treated board against the concrete how to save money really fast and have the XPS sit on top of that, or does the XPS go all the way from the how to save money really fast ceiling joist to the bare concrete floor? Third question: on the building science article, it mentions that XPS is highly flammable, and that gypsum board should be placed for fire protection. My question is, do I need the gypsum, or will sheetrock do the same job? Will it be just as fire retardant if I attach how to save money really fast the drywall to the 2×4 frames that I will build against the XPS, or is the gypsum supposed to go against the XPS how to save money really fast and then the 2×4 and then the sheetrock? Last question: I have several sewer drains that are right up against how to save money really fast the concrete (no way to put the XPS behind them) what do I do in that situation?

I am remodeling a small 5X7 bathroom in a 1979 how to save money really fast home in northern virginia. The 5ft wide shower/tub wall was made out of tiled drywall over 1×3 fur, covered with old aluminum foil “insulation” (thin layer of aluminum foil facing the cinder block wall, and a layer of paper facing the drywall, with a thin layer of plastic in between). There is copper piping that goes through the wall at how to save money really fast about 4ft to an exterior faucet (lots of cold air coming through). Bottom 3-ft are under ground level. Some 1×3 were molded at old tub level. A contractor recommended replacing the molded 1x3s and covering them how to save money really fast with aluminum bubble wrap “insulation” before installing hardie backer boards. Hardie boards will be waterproofed with kerdi membrane. My two questions: 1) should I use 1/2 foam panel instead of bubble wrap? (would love to use thicker foam but I am concerned how to save money really fast about code clearances…. Shower is already 28in deep only and with 15 in how to save money really fast requirement from toilet to shower and vanity I don’t have any space to move the shower curb)… I’m not sure what would the AL bubble wrap accomplish how to save money really fast for insulation. 2) is it advisable to keep the exterior faucet behind the how to save money really fast shower wall, or should I remove it? In either case, I’d seal the hole through wall with expanding foam.

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